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Fatty Western diets make prostate cancer more aggressive

Daily Mail (UK) - 15/01/2018
Researchers at Harvard and Beth Israel have made a 'breakthrough' discovery about how prostate cancer is fueled.

Flipping the switch: Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasis

Science Daily (US) - 15/01/2018
Researchers have shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis.

Novel polygenic hazard score captures age variations of aggressive prostate cancer

News Medical (Australia) - 12/01/2018
An international team, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually.

New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancer

Science Daily (US) - 11/01/2018
Medical researchers have developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually.

Mitt Romney Treated for Prostate Cancer Last Year

MedicineNet (US) - 11/01/2018
Title: Mitt Romney Treated for Prostate Cancer Last YearCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/9/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/10/2018 12:00:00 AM

Men who follow Mediterranean diet have lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer, study finds

News Medical (Australia) - 11/01/2018
In a new study published in The Journal of Urology, researchers determined that men who followed a Mediterranean diet, rich in fish, boiled potatoes, whole fruits, vegetables, legumes, and olive oil, and low consumption of juices had lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer than those who followed other dietary patterns like Prudent or Western diets.

A more complete Mediterranean diet may protect against aggressive prostate cancer

Science Daily (US) - 10/01/2018
Researchers determined that men who followed a Mediterranean diet, rich in fish, boiled potatoes, whole fruits, vegetables, legumes, and olive oil, and low consumption of juices had lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PC) than those who followed other dietary patterns like Prudent or Western diets.

Virgin men have half the risk of catching prostate cancer

Daily Mail (UK) - 08/01/2018
Researchers found that men who had never experienced sexual intercourse were 47 per cent less likely to develop the disease, the most common type of cancer among men in the UK.

Rutgers researcher receives $1 million grant for international prostate cancer study

News Medical (Australia) - 03/01/2018
A $1 million grant from Gateway for Cancer Research will help Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Urologic Oncology Chief Isaac Yi Kim, MD, PhD, MBA evaluate the impact of surgically removing the prostate in men with metastatic prostate cancer in the United States and Asia.

Study suggests new target to treat prostate cancer

News Medical (Australia) - 22/12/2017
Hokkaido University researchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer.

A kiss of death for prostate cancer

Science Daily (US) - 22/12/2017
Researchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer.

A kiss of death for prostate cancer

Asia Research News - 22/12/2017
Hokkaido University researchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer.

Prostate diagnosis shame: Men wait four times as long

Daily Mail (UK) - 19/12/2017
It takes 56 days, on average, from the time a man reports symptoms to a GP, for him to be confirmed with prostate cancer - whereas women are told they have breast cancer after 14 days.

Prostate cancer researchers find significant disparities between two liquid biopsy providers

News Medical (Australia) - 16/12/2017
Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers.

Researchers adopt new approach to treating advanced prostate cancer

News Medical (Australia) - 13/12/2017
Scientists have proposed a new approach to preventing the proliferation of prostate tumor cells that are no longer responding to treatment. Prostate cancer can usually be cured via surgical removal of the tumor and/or the use of radiotherapy, but in one-fifth of cases, patients also require treatment with drugs to continue removing tumor cells. However, these drugs are only effective for up to three years, after which the cancer continues to develop.

Researchers discover new way to attack drug-resistant prostate cancer cells

News Medical (Australia) - 13/12/2017
In most cases, prostate cancer is cured by surgical removal of the tumor and/or by radiotherapy. However, 20% of patients will need treatment to remove tumor cells but this treatment ceases to be effective after two or three years and the cancer develops further.

Closing in on advanced prostate cancer

Science Daily (US) - 12/12/2017
Medical researchers have discovered a new avenue through which to attack prostrate cancer cells that have developed drug-resistance.

Shorter course of radiation may be preferred treatment for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

News Medical (Australia) - 05/12/2017
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among males in the United States. Approximately, 180,000 men are diagnosed each year, and approximately 95 percent of these men have localized disease that is potentially curable.

Shorter course of treatment may provide better outcome for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

Science Daily (US) - 05/12/2017
Researchers found that the one-month duration HRT, was associated with a significant improvement in prostate cancer recurrence compared to the two-month duration CRT and therefore would be reasonable to consider in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer who do not have risk factors that could predispose the patient to bladder side effects several years after the treatment is complete.

PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatment

Science Daily (US) - 04/12/2017
For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference. In a study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Australian researchers demonstrate that PET scans can identify which of these prostate cancer patients would benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT).