Caregivers

Family members and friends also need to adjust to the after-effects of a stroke. A person's carers must learn rehabilitationThe treatment of a person with an illness or disability to improve their function and health. techniques, and may have to assist with the general activities of daily living. Such demands can put a strain on relationships and may put carers under immense stressRelating to injury or concern..[1]

Because stroke happens so abruptly, most caregivers have little time to adapt to their new role, and feel unprepared for the challenges they face.[3]

Caring for a person who has had a stroke can also be physically demanding - for example, tasks such as helping a person to become mobile, preventing falls, and assisting with bathing can all be strenuous.[3]

For these reasons, support and training for caregivers is important. Formal training has been shown to help carers to cope and improve their quality of life, as well as that of the person they are caring for.[2] Informal emotional support from family and friends is also helpful.[3]

References: 
  1. Ostwald SK, Davis S, Hersch G et al. Evidence-based educational guidelines for stroke survivors after discharge home. J Neurosci Nurs 2008; 40: 173-91.
  2. Teasell RW and Kalra L. What's new in stroke rehabilitationThe treatment of a person with an illness or disability to improve their function and health.: back to basics. Stroke 2005; 36: 215-7.
  3. Steiner V, Pierce L, Drahuschak S et al. Emotional support, physical help, and health of caregivers of stroke survivors. J Neurosci Nurs 2008; 40: 48-54.